Monday, July 19, 2010

Queen Anne's Lace...

I'm almost certain that the locals think I'm a bit odd. On more than one occasion, I've been known to be seen pulled over on the side of the road examining flowers and pebbles. Today my white Jeep could be seen next to a ditch. I was in the ditch with my pocket knife, cutting the lacy fronds of the Daucus carota, also known as "Queen Anne's Lace" or "Wild Carrot". I love the sprigs of white flowers. I remember discovering that in between the pages of a big volume of Webster's Dictionary, my grandma had pressed these flowers. Time had bled the green from the stems and leaves, leaving them a dusty yellow color. The flowers were still white, but were tinged with that particular shade of yellow. I think before the summer is done, I might do the same.

8 comments:

Zoe Nelson said...

You can also put the flowers in containers of water with a little food coloring. That way you can have Queen Anne's Lace in any color you want!

Sabine said...

Just don't get caught cutting the flowers! There is a state law against cutting wildflowers in Penna, I believe. Though I have never heard of anyone being arrested. Not like the saguaro cactus law in AZ, there are lots of people arrested for moving those.

PS. I don't think you are crazy for loving Queen Anne's lace!

Ann
http://www.mycriticaleye.com

Jenny said...

My sister and I would collect large armfuls and do vases for each color of food coloring. It was like a daily ritual to check on their color absorption. Ah - summer vacation when you are 8...

Melissa Meman said...

They grow like weeds in my yard and garden. If you let one grow, lots come back the next year because they reseed and blow around. A bit of a nuisance when out of context, but beautiful in the right setting! You have inspired me to go out and cut mine! I have just the right vintage McCoy vase to put them in :) Thanks Andrew!

Andrew Thornton said...

I was reading that the Queen Anne's Lace is a good companion plant. If planted near tomato plants, the tomatoes produce more. Also, they draw away some of the nasty little bugs that are attracted to vegetables.

I also read that it can be used as a contraceptive, but I have no use for that. I think mostly they just look pretty.

Janet said...

I believe black swallowtails lay their eggs on Queen Annes lace..my father used to raise them and I would watch. Of all flowers I think this flower is Royalty!

Four Seasons in a Life said...

Greetings Andrew,

I finally have a few Queen Anne's Lace growing in the garden the last couple of years and each the number slightly increases. This year I shall collect the seeds and spread them myself.

I love the way they look in the sun and seeing butterflies come for a visit.

Many years ago, I too stopped by the side of the road to photograph these flowers growing wild for a photograph I was sending to a friend for their birthday.

Wishing you a wonderful day,
Egmont

Cindy Caraway said...

Hi Andrew,
Queen Anne's Lace has always been one of my favorites, too. I'm intrigued by the tiny little dark purple blossom right smack in the center of the blossom :)